Gloria Newman
Gloria Newman Petersen
Gloria Newman  ‎(I478)‎
Surname: Newman
Given Names: Gloria

Gender: FemaleFemale
      

Birth: 23 November 1915 35 32 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death: 11 March 2009 ‎(Age 93)‎ Boise, Ada, Idaho, USA
Personal Facts and Details
Birth Birth 23 November 1915 35 32 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Marriage Marriage Milo James Petersen - 3 June 1936 ‎(Age 20)‎ Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Gloria Newman & Milo James Petersen Wedding PhotoGloria Newman & Milo James Petersen Wedding Photo



media/FAMILY DATA FILES/Petersen Side/Petersen/MJ Petersen 1936 wedding.jpgmedia/FAMILY DATA FILES/Petersen Side/Petersen/MJ Petersen 1936 wedding.jpg


Death Death 11 March 2009 ‎(Age 93)‎ Boise, Ada, Idaho, USA

Cause of death: natural causes

Show Details Note: Her obituary read as follows -
Gloria Newman Petersen died of natural causes and went to meet her Savior on March 11, 2009. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 14, 2009 at Cloverdale Funeral Home with viewing beginning at 1 p.m. Graveside servicewillfollow at Cloverdale Memorial Park. Gloria was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, to David and Jessie Coon Newman. She had one brother and three sisters. She was a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Gloria andhersister Bert h a sang duets on programs all over the Salt Lake area. She participated in the 100th anniversary pageant in the Salt Lake Tabernacle for the LDS Church. Gloria worked for her father in his IGA grocery store while she attendedschool.She attended th e University of Utah for three years prior to marrying Milo James Petersen on June 3, 1936, in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple, and they had five children. The family lived in Salt Lake, Los Angeles, Montana, Bountiful, andBoise.She belonged to fou r PTAs at one time, was on the Boise PTA Council as co-radio chairman with Milo, was co-chairman for stunt night at South Jr. High, and was a member of Alpha Delta Kappa sorority. After Milo's early death in 1955,Gloria raisedher five childr en al one while completing her B.S. degree and was in the first graduating class at Boise State University. She taught first grade at Koelsch Elementary School in Boise for 24 years. She served in various callings inthe LDS Churchand sang in the choir. She served in the Boise LDS Temple for eight years. Gloria enjoyed gardening, sewing, and good music. She played the piano most of her life. Survivors include four of her children, Karen Harris of Boise; M.James Petersenof Boise, and his wife Sandra; Richard Williams Petersen of West Linn, Ore., and his wife Candace; and Kathryn Murray of Blackfoot, and her husband Ronnie K.; and daughter-in-law, Lydia Petersen. She is also survived by 19grandchildren and 38great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, her parents, her son, David Otto Petersen, three sisters, one brother, a son-in-law, a grandson, and a great-granddaughter. The family would like to thank KimAllen and all the staffmembers at Amber Lane Residence in Boise for their tender mercies to our mother. Thanks also to the Accent Hospice staff: Wendy, Becky, and Christine.
Published in the Idaho Statesman on 3/13/2009

Burial Burial 14 March 2009 ‎(3 days after death)‎ Boise, Ada, Idaho, USA
Cemetery Cemetery: Cloverdale Memorial Park
Address:
1200 North Cloverdale Road
Boise, ID 83713

Last Change Last Change 16 December 2012 - 12:23:58 - by: mbpetey
View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F90)
David Newman
1880 - 1959
Jessie Coon
1883 - 1963
David Hirst Newman
1905 - 1993
Florence Jessie Newman
1907 - 1965
Bertha Newman
1913 - 1962
Gloria Newman
1915 - 2009
Loraine Newman
1927 - 1998

Immediate Family  (F44)
Milo James Petersen
1910 - 1955
Private
-
Private
-
David Otto Petersen
1944 - 1996
Private
-
Private
-


Notes

Note
INTERVIEW WITH GLORIA NEWMAN PETERSEN
Monday, September 9, 1996 By Karen Petersen Harris

Karen: I remember stories about when your dad used to have you girls start the furnace
in the mornings. Can you tell about how you warmed up the house before your parents got up?
-- Gloria: This was when I started college. I would get up to start the coal furnace, not a
stoker furnace. I chopped up the big pieces of coal so they would go into the furnace. I also cut wood with a hatchet. I would get the furnace going so it would warm the house. Then we would fix our own breakfast, if we ate any. We then caughtthe bus downtown and then a streetcar to the University of Utah. We started the furnace whether it was Sunday or a school day. I don't remember if Bertha did it or just I did it Bertha may have been married then.

Karen: Your dad was a strict disciplinarian, wasn't he? He owned a grocery store
When times were tough you always had a lot of food, but he made sure you girls worked in the store. How long did you work in the store?
-- Gloria: Yes, he was strict I worked there up until I got married. We were in about the second grade. We had to go over at recess and sell candy because the children in those days could go across the street We had this big case with all kindsof penny candies The kids would say, "I want one of those; how much are those?" We would say, "Two for a penny. " They would ask, "What's three for a penny?" Then we would count that out. The rich kids might have had a nickel to spend. We wouldspend a long time on each child. We sold the
candy until the bell rang. Then we would run across the street to school.

Karen: Your dad wasn't real generous with his money, was he? I remember stories you used to tell about when you went to college and could have only one pair of shoes .
-- Gloria: I went to a lot of dances, sometimes five a week, when I was in high school and
at the university. I got a pair of high heeled shoes. We would go on geology trips on the mountains to learn the different types of flowers and weeds, etc. and I was in my high heeled shoes The others were in their tennis shoes.

Karen: How was that story different from when you married our dad. How did you get
your shoes then?
-- Gloria: Milo would sell a big account at one of the shoe stores and would tell me to go
buy some shoes at that store. I asked how many I could buy, and he said I could get as many as I wanted. One day I went in and they were $1.00 a pair or $.50 on sale. I took Karen with me and we got her 1/2 dozen pair, and I got eight pairs.Milo didn't say a word when we got home.

Karen: I remember you had a pair of striped colors and a pair of clear shoes.
-- Gloria: Yes, I had a plastic pair also. I had a lot of shoes and hats. When I was married, everyone wore hats, so Milo would go to town on payday and get a hat for $1.00 They were in the display window, and Milo would say that I would lookreal ly good in that particular hat, so I guess I had more hats than most people did.

Karen: Didn't he buy you a mink coat, too, which you never wore? Isn't it in the deep
freeze?
-- Gloria: I still have it I think. I was in college when I needed a new coat. My dad was
very economical. We couldn't have too many clothes, but I really needed a winter coat, so Mother said she would take me out for one. Dad said not to pay any more than $60 for it That was a lot of money then I saw this beautiful Hudson Bay furcoat trimmed with an ermine collar. I fell in love with it. Mother said we could take it home and if Dad said I can't have it, we would bring it back. I remember it cost nearly $100. When we took it home, Dad was sitting in his chair smoking hispipe.I put it on and walked by him and
asked him to look at my coat. I said I wouldn't tell him how much I paid for it yet. He nodded his head. I told Mom he didn't say anything, so I guess it was my coat.

Karen: Did your mother have to account for all of her money?
-- Gloria: Mother never took a dime from the store. We had accounts at ZCMI and the Paris, etc., but she bought just what she really needed. I think her favorite dress was one I gave to her after I was married. She was very frugal.

Karen: Nowadays when we take out the trash, we put it in a plastic bag and perhaps
forgot to tie the top and just throw it in the garbage. I remember being at Grandma's. She would take a piece of newspaper and put a small amount of scraps in it, roll it up tightly, put a rubber band around it, put it in a sack, and take it outt othe garbage Was she a neat housekeeper?
--Gloria: She was an exceptionally neat housekeeper. Every spring Bertha and I and Mother washed all of the walls and woodwork We would put the curtains on curtain stretchers. We would get such sore fingers, but we didn't mind doing it Wethought it was just regular work. We did it to every room. We usually tore the whole house apart in one week, instead of just doing one room at a time Dad told us how you could choose a good wife. Give her a potato If she peels it down with aknife and t akes a lot of skin and potato off, she would be a spendthrift, so don't many her If she scraped the skin off, don't marry
her because she would be a cheapskate. Every time I would go to Kathy's and be peeling potatoes, Ron would say, "Remember, don't take too much or too little off those potatoes."

Karen: I also remember that Grandma did a lot of canning. She would always bring up
cherries from the basement. Did you girls help with the canning, too?
-- Gloria: I don't remember helping too much with the canning. I remember when we got
married, we would put up about 60 quarts of peaches, 60 quarts of pears, and 60 quarts of cherries and all kinds of relishes Whatever somebody gave us, we put up. I remember that poor Florence used to put up 120 jars of each fruit because shehad such a large family. We used to feel so sony for her because she was usually pregnant and had to put up all those fruits. She didn't get any help out of anybody as she had all boys at that time

Karen: Tell us about your family and how many children were in it.
-- Gloria: Mother and Dad had five children. I was next to the youngest. Lorraine was
born 12 years to the day after my birthday. Dave was the oldest, then Florence,
then Bertha, and then I and Lorraine. Florence had eight children -- Ralph,
Bob, Steve, Gerald, Paul, Jean, Gloria, Donna. Bertha had six children. I had
five. Lorraine had four. Dave had four girls. He wanted a boy real badly, but
he didn't get one.

Karen: Was Dave on a mission when you were growing up?
-- Gloria: Yes, he was on an LDS mission to England. I remember the day he came home
he had a derby a cane and spats. Bertha and I went in the bedroom and giggled
because we thought he was so funny.

Karen: You and Bertha had a lot of fun together, didn't you? You used to pretend to
be each other and trick the boys .
--Gloria: Before I get to that, Bertha was 2 1/2 years older than I was. I guess I must
have gone out really young. Dad would let us go because Bertha was the older, and he thought I would keep her in line if I went along. I went out real young. We always had a good, clean time. We went to about five or six dances a week. We wouldgo to Salt Air, to Lagoon, the Old Mill Club, the Bluebird, and the Coconut Grove. There were a lot. We had the boys take us except for Salt Air. Everybody went stag to Salt Air We would take the open air train from 5th West and North Temple andgo t o Salt Air It didn't cost anything to ride. The boys would just come up and sign our dance cards. We always had a full dance card. We had a ball. We always wore high heels, but coming home sometimes we would have to take off our shoesbecause our feet hurt.

Karen: Sometimes you pretended to be Bertha and she pretended to be you.
-- Gloria: That was in the grocery store The bread men came a lot. There was Wonder Bread and Royal Bread It cost about five cents a loaf. It was a little smaller than our loaves. You could also get it for ten cents or the ten cents ones atthree for a quarter. The men would come in and say, "Hello, Bertha" She would say, "I am not Bertha I am Gloria." We had another sister we made up. We had three names. Gladys was the other name. We would have those guys going all the time. Theywould c omein and say, "Hello, Gladys. " We
would say that wasn't who we were. We had a ball with the bread men and the other salesmen Bertha and I got to a point where we could get to be a buyer for the store Of course, if there were ten cans of peas left, we would buy another case I gotg ood at math. We didn't have cash registers like we do now. We had a register where we would ring up ten cents and put in a dime. We would have a long list of numbers, and I would add them. I remember one customer would say, "You can't add thatfas t." I would say the total was right. He would say it couldn't be. He would take about 15 minutes and add it himself and other people would be waiting around Then he would see that my total was right.

Karen: I want to ask you a couple more questions about your parents before we move
on. Your Dad wasn't real active in the LDS Church when you were growing up, was he?
-- Gloria: Dad was married in the temple to Mother, but wasn't active during the time I
remember. I think his cousin who was bishop at the time spoiled it a lot. He would come to the store and say, "Dave, when you quit smoking, you can come to church." I think this really had something to do with it. Mother would get Dad's clothesou t every Sunday and hang them out on the line to freshen them, hoping that the wind would take out the smoke smell. Dad never went to church unless Mother did this. He did go once in a great while, but most of the time he didn't go. He did sendDav eon a mission to England. Mother was
very, very religious. She served as a religion class teacher. I think she was the one who kept our family in tact. I don't think she ever had any faults. She was very quiet. When Dad's brothers came around they would sit and joke and sometimespla ycards, but Mother would go in the kitchen and fix them something to eat. Dad would get a big steak and Mom would cook it and give them each a dinner.

Karen: When you parents retired from the grocery store On the he west side, did you
move to the east side of town?
-- Gloria: They moved to Parkway Avenue., The bishop came to visit Dad one day and
said, "Dave, we want you to come to church.," Dad told them he smoked and drank tea, but they said that if that was the worst thing he did he should come to church because he was probably better than a lot of other people. So, he quit smoking. Ic aught him a couple of times out in my back yard when they would visit us, but he really did try to quit and I think eventually did quit completely.
Dad was called on a Stake Mission later, Mother was so happy in those days, I don't think I have ever known her to be happier. They would walk to the ward and go to the temple. Dad died ‎(around 75 or 76)‎ of a heart condition. Mother died of ahear t condition when she was about three years younger. She lived longer than Dad did. Her best outing was going to the temple with a certain lady and then they would go to ZCMI to have something to eat. She thought that was wonderful becauseDad neve r did take her out to dinner.

Karen: Was she a seamstress? Did she sew a lot of clothes? Is that where you learned
how to sew?
-- Gloria Mother sewed most of our clothes up until we were teenagers. I remember sitting at the machine the night before Mother's Day because Bertha and I would be on the Church program and Mom would sit up half the night making our dresses.She would always put so many little frills on. We thought they were wonderful.

Karen: Every time I was in a dance recital or needed a costume, I remember that everybody else's mother just sewed on a ruffle, but my costumes were fancier, especially my can-can costume. You always were such a good seamstress and I didn'tapprec iate it. I remember when you made me a dress and I didn't like it. I didn't like homemade clothes, but I remember you were very good at sewing costumes.
When your parents died, were they buried in Salt Lake? Do you know what cemetery?
-- Gloria: Yes, Salt Lake City Cemetery, I wouldn't be able to find their grave now.

Karen: Where did you meet Milo?
-- Gloria: I met Milo when I was 16 at the University of Utah I was a grade ahead in school mainly because my Dad absolutely wouldn't let me go to kindergarten, He said I should go up to first grade. I would go to first grade and they would takem e to kindergarten because my birthday was about a month too late. I would go home and Dad would get real angry with me and say I had to go to first grade. I remember one time they picked me up, chair and all, and taking me back to kindergarten.Th ey finally got tired of taking me back, so they let me stay. I met Milo when I was 16. He would have been 21. We met in English class the first year" I sat right next to him, I turned 17 in November just after school had started. He was thenin my biology class.
Karen: Was it he who wrote the two papers and you got the good grade?
-- Gloria: I was never good at writing and he was always getting A’s in his reports. I
talked him into writing a report for me one time. He wrote one for him and one for me Mine came back with A- and he came back with a C, I believe. I never got over that. He kidded me about it at the time because he wrote two papers and got an Aon one and a C on the other one .

Karen: Where did you get married?
-- Gloria: Milo went down to California for about a year but kept writing to me. He came back and we started going together. He gave me a diamond. I remember he wanted to ask Dad if he could marry me. In those days that was how you got married.Yo udidn't just run off. I remember sitting on the piano stool with Milo. Dad would get up and walk in the dining room and sit down to read his newspaper or something. So, we would go in the dining room and sit down and he would pick up and goback i nto the parlor again. He kept that up. He said afterwards that he knew what was coming. He was going to make it hard for us.

Karen: Did he kid you every time Dad came to the door?
-- Gloria: He said, “Here comes the cake-eater.” He said that though about Keith Martin
and Ralph Putnam also -- everyone of the girls' husbands. He would say, “Here comes the cake-eater again.” Milo gave me my diamond in January, and we got married in June of 1936 in the Salt Lake City temple.

Karen: How many children did you have?
-- Gloria: I had five Karen, Jim, Dave, Dick, and Kathy,

Karen: Dad didn't have any sisters, did he?
-- Gloria: No, Dad had three brothers, Bill, Doug, and Gene, He didn't have any sisters, so he sort of put women up on a pedestal. He thought everyone should be kind to the women. He always put me up on a pedestal, He always had pet names forme.H e was very romantic One was "Jody". My brother and Dad also called me Jody. He was very, very romantic and it used to embarrass me a little bit because I was not that way. I was not outgoing, and he was very outgoing.

Karen: I remember you said when you were expecting a baby and perhaps Bertha was too, that Dad would baby you. He would say, "Gloria is expecting a baby and can't do this or that."
When did Dad's parents die?
-- Gloria: His mother died when he was about 17. His dad died about the first year we were married. His mother died of cancer. He said she used to go out in the back of the barn and cry and cry and hold her stomach. She must have been in anawfull ylot of pain. They didn't have the medications that we have now. His father died of a heart problem.

Karen: Dad had pretty much of a rough life growing up, didn't he?
-- Gloria: Yes, he really did. His dad wanted him to work out at the Kennecott Copper Company. He didn't want to and his mother wanted him to go to college. She pushed him He played the violin, and his dad thought that was silly. He said he gavea concert at the high school one time ‎(just him)‎ on his violin. He had forgotten how to play it after he got married. We always kidded him about it
But, his dad would say that he wanted him to go out to Kennecott Copper. Dad would say that he was not going to carry a lunch pail. His dad said he could make a lot of money going there, but Milo said he wanted to get an education and wouldn'tcar ry a lunch pail. He never did carry a lunch pail. His aunts thought that was pretty wonderful. His aunts always thought he was something, because he had an education and none of the rest of the family did. He was an outgoing man – self made,self- taught. That is what his best friend, Jack Bennion, said. He told me he could have talked at Milo's funeral. He said he was a self-made man and he could have told a lot of things about him.

Karen: When you and Dad were married, you lived in Salt Lake City and Dad worked
in hotels.
-- Gloria: When we first got married, he worked at the Perry Hotel as a clerk. Then he wasn't getting further because the boss' wife worked there too and she got all the best days off, etc. I was so ill and was pregnant with Karen I had to goclea rdown the hall to the bathroom. It was really difficult We had to shower down the hall, too. He then got a job as manager of the Moxim Hotel, where we lived. Karen was born the night we moved in. A maid changed our bed all the time and camein and did my dishes for me and washed the baby's diapers. You had to put them out on a pulley tacked on to the next roof out the window. We used coal then, and when I went to bring them in they were all sooty. It was not very convenient.

We finally decided to go to California. We got there with $8 or $12 in our pocket because he had car trouble on the way, We had a Chevy. We got to Beaver City and the transmission or something went out on us, so we had to stay a couple of daysint he hotel there. Milo belonged to the Hotel Greeters at the time, and we were able to have one of the nicer rooms free. We stayed at one hotel a couple of nights and he said not to tell them we
were out of work. Milo went out and found an apartment. He left in the morning and told me he wouldn't be home until he found a job. It got to be about 11:00 p.m. and I was in a strange city with a crying baby and didn't know what to do. Hefinall ycame home about 11:00 p.m. and said he had found himself a job at the Alexandria Hotel. He borrowed enough money for us to eat on for two weeks and then got paid. We returned the money and borrowed for another two weeks. We kept that upuntil weg ot caught up. He then moved to the Mayflower Hotel and worked for Senator Hamilton. It was across from the Biltmore Hotel, which took up one whole square block in California. It was the best there was in California. The Mayflower gotthe overflowf rom the Biltmore. Milo got to know a lot of people there in Los Angeles.

Jim was born in a maternity home in Los Angeles. When he was probably six months old, Ralph and Florence came down. We were in the middle of World War II. Ralph had to go to San Francisco for a meeting, so Florence stayed with us. We had blackout s and we had to hang up sheets and blankets at the windows so they couldn't see any lights. The Japanese planes flew over, but the government kept it really quiet. It wasn't in the newspapers. You could go outside and stand on the lawn andsee all the shrapnel from the guns. I remember the two planes they said ended up in Santa Barbara that were shot down. There was shrapnel all over the school grounds in the morning. We didn't realize it was that dangerous. It was quite anexperience for u s. Then Dad wrote and said we must come to Salt Lake and get out of Los Angeles because it was too dangerous" We then moved to Salt Lake where Milo worked for the grocery store. He could see he wasn't needed as Dave and
Lorraine were there.

We finally got a little place of our own and he worked for Clover Leaf Dairy, then Sego Milk, then into radio from there. The first radio job was KUTA in SLC We moved to Butte, Montana and worked for KOPR, then KGEM in Boise, Karen worked atKGEMi n Boise as Miss KGEM. The funny thing is, I was talking to the girl who does my hair, She is about Karen's age" I asked her if she remembered when they had Miss KGEM on the radio. She said, "I sure do, I used to listen to it all the time."I toldh er it was my daughter. She could hardly believe that.

Karen: Yes, Dad always took care of me and made sure I had good jobs. My friends always worked at Two Boys In and Out or something like that, but Dad said I wasn't going to work in a place like that. I should work in an office. He got me a jobat the Ada Theater in the candy dept., then a job at the Pinney Theater, where I worked in the candy dept. All my brothers worked at the Ada. Then I used to go to the radio station and pull records, answer the phone, and later typed the radiologs. Hemade sure I knew how to do a lot of things so I would have a good background.
--Gloria: Yes, and Jim cut the grass for them.

Karen: One last thing about the war What were some of the rations you had?
Gloria: In World War II the silk hose were rationed. Several kinds of meats were. We didn't seem to suffer because we had the grocery store. Bertha and I would put some of the silk stockings away so we had all the silk stockings we needed. Dadwou ld be rationed on them, though, and had only so many boxes. That didn't seem to hurt our family at all. I remember, though, when I was a young girl that they rationed butter. Yes, and gas. We had a gas tank out in front of the first store wehad.

Karen: When you and Dad moved to Boise you first lived in the foothills and then moved to 1109 Houston Road. How long have you been living there?
-- Gloria: We have been living there about 45 years.

Continuing of interview with Gloria Petersen with Kathy Murray and Karen Harris
Jerome, Idaho - Sunday, October 13, 1996

Karen: Tell us about your college days - if you joined a sorority - etc.
Gloria: My friend and I were asked to join a sorority. Her father had passed away and her mother couldn't afford to put her into a sorority. My Dad said I could if I would like to. Dad was so proud of the fact that I went to college, becausethere were no girls around who went to college. In fact, I don't know of any boys who went to college either. I decided then that I wouldn't join the sorority because my friend couldn't join. This was at the University of Utah, where I attendedthree ye ars.

Kathy: I remembered a couple of stories Mom used to tell me, so we will back up a little. Mom, do you remember the time you told me about when you and Bertha had to get the potatoes ready while your father was out of the store?
-- Gloria: Every time Dad would go home for lunch he would always see that Bertha and I
had a few things to do so we didn't just stand around or talk to our friends. One day he said, here's a couple hundred pounds of potatoes that I want you to put into ten-pound bags. Dad went home and we messed around for a little while. Ifinally said that we had to get the potatoes bagged before Dad came back or he would be angry with us. Bertha said, ''I'm not going to do it." I said, "But it has got to be done." She said she wouldn't do it, I started to cry and said that ifshe didn't doit, I would have to do it, so I did most of it. She didn't care and let me go ahead and do it.

Kathy: One time you mentioned a robbery in your store and how scary that was.
-- Gloria: Dave was at the meat counter and I don't believe Dad was at the store. I was in the checking area. Two men came in. I will never forget them, One was tall and one was short and heavy. They looked around. They looked quite suspicious.Id idn't think about it, but Dave did. He said they went back down to the meat counter and asked where someone lived. He said that was his clue, so he took a pretty good look at them. They came up to the cashier area where I was and looked aroundali ttle bit and then left. That evening Dave went home for dinner as he was through for the day. Dad and I were then alone. Just before we were ready to close, the two men came in again. I remember them very well. Of course, Dad hadn't seen themand now he was down at the back and I was up cashiering, They asked a couple of questions. Finally Dad came up and I stepped behind a display of morning milk. The smallest man pulled out a gun and said, "Give me all your money," I was going tothrowa can of milk at him, but since there were two fellows, I was afraid I would miss and then they would shoot. I stood there, and finally Dad gave them the money
from the cash register. He told them that was all he had. Usually he carried his money in his back pocket and that was where it was that night. It was thousands of dollars. He didn't trust the banks and carried his money with him all the time.Heg ave the fellows just what was in the cash register and they marched us to the ice box and had us face it.
They felt in Dad's pockets. They felt everyone except where his money was. They left and Dad went to the neighbors to call the police because we didn't have even a nickel to use the
pay phone. I was frightened to death, but I had to go out in the dark. I didn't know if the men were sitting there in their car or what. I called the police at the neighbors. A while later, we were called to court as they had found the twofellows .I had to get up on the witness stand and testify against them. They put them in jail. Years later I remember when I was married I swore that the youngest fellow came around by our house and tried to sell me a refrigerator I was sofrightened. I t old Milo about it, and he said to watch out, lock the door at night, and don't answer the door when he went to work. That was quite a different experience. I remember I was in college at that time.

Kathy: Mother, can you tell us a little about our dad and your courtship?
-- Gloria: I told you how we met in our English class at the University of Utah We had
to sit together due to the alphabetical seating. Milo told me that when he graduated from high school he went to Uncle Lamar's home in Jerome and worked in the fields for a couple of years. He had gotten word that his mother had died, so UncleLam ar took them to Magna. That was when they had the big storm in Centerville. All the big boulders came down and closed off the road. Somehow they got through and got to Magna for the funeral Milo was really on his own after that. He went toSalt La keand worked in hotels as a
bellboy. I don't think he worked anywhere else. After we were married, Milo and I were living in the Moxim Hotel. Uncle Gene ‎(Milo's brother)‎ was left without a mother as a teenager, so Milo got him a room at the hotel. He would go out for hismea ls and then come up to me and beg a quarter off me to go to a movie. Then he would go to Milo and beg a quarter off Milo to go to a movie. He had a little bit of money then to spend on pop, etc. and would sit in a movie all day long. Thatpoor boy didn't have much of a life when he was younger. He lived with us for a long time
When we moved to Los Angeles, where I had Jim, Gene lived with us for a couple of years there. Milo always got Gene and his brothers Bill and Doug jobs. He was father to all of those boys. He was real kind. It was hard on me because I was havingb abies and then had teenagers coming in to live with me.

Kathy: Tell us about your honeymoon.
Gloria: Milo's boss gave us $100 and since we were with the Hotel Greeters, we went to Pike's Peak in Colorado and stayed in all the nicest hotels all the way along free of charge because of the greeters association. We would get the bridalsuite and the best dinners they had and wouldn't charge us anything for them. The only bad place we had was in Colorado Springs. That was a funny place. We got to Pike's Peak and everybody was going along and then their cars would stop. Ourswould be t heonly car out of all of them that made it up to the top. We
had a little Model A Ford, but it got us clear up to the top and back without much trouble. I think we may have had a flat tire.

The girls were talking about the first meals they made. I don't remember the first meal I ever made, but I do know that Milo enjoyed every drop of everything I made. I would make muffins and rice puddings and look in cookbooks to get differentrec ipes, which usually turned out real well. If I burned something, I would throw it away and not tell him, and we would have something else for dinner. Milo really did love my cooking. That was because he had to eat in hotels all the time. Hewould goto cheaper places because he was putting himself through college and helping to support a couple of brothers. He said he ate in “greasy spoons.” He would order eggs and have them put potatoes on top of the eggs so he wouldn't have tolook at th e eggs as they made him sick. He would always ask me before we were married if dinner was
nearly ready, and I would tell him that we had already eaten because I knew my Dad would not want him walking in on us for every meal. He called him the “cake eater.”

When we lived in Boise, Milo was working for KGEM as general manager. The studios were in the Owyhee Hotel The Royal Restaurant across the street had the best food in town. It seems I would make a big cherry pie and Milo would come home and say," Do you know what we had for lunch today? We had the best cherry pie." A couple of days later I would make a lemon pie. He would come home and say, "Do you know what we had for lunch today? We
had the best lemon pie" That kept up regardless of what I made. It seemed that was what he had for dessert that day. I got to the point where I didn't want to cook anymore if he would eat out better than I was.

Karen: We know Dad had asthma real bad and saw the effects of that in his later years.
You mentioned that Dad wasn't that sick when you were first married. Did he or you have any serious illnesses?
-- Gloria: No, I was always very healthy until just recently I don't think Dad had any other illnesses. He did have more asthma than I realized because I remember living in Los Angeles and the fog would roll in. We were actually in Garden City,ab out four miles from the coast He would say, "Open all the doors I can't breathe." When we opened the doors, the fog rolled right in the house, but I couldn't tell him that. He would want all the windows open. Finally, when we moved to Boise,he re alized we had to have the windows closed because of all the allergies he had. I really believe the big tree we had in the back yard behind our bedroom really gave him asthma because I think it is giving me a little bit now. I never had anallergy before.

Karen: I remember Dad as being very, very sick all the time. I remember when I worked at KGEM that Dad was sick and would be on his way home and would have such a bad attack that he would say, "Call Jody." I remember seeing him lying on thefloor at the radio station, trying to catch his breath. He was pretty frantic. Even the paramedics couldn't get him to settle down or respond much, but Mom would walk in and pat his head and tell him she was there. He would get all calm when Momcame i n.
-- Gloria: He didn't seem to want anyone to do anything for him but me. Finally, the
doctor gave him some medication through his arm. I couldn't be there every minute. We tried to get Karen to give him a shot, but she said she just could not do it. Jim did it then. We got a big grapefruit and a syringe and taught Jim how to gives hots on the grapefruit. If I wasn't home and Dad had to have a shot, then Jim would give it to him. I couldn't even leave the house near the end even to the grocery store. I was pretty homebound. One time there was no one around and I had to goto the drug store or grocery store for something. When I got home, Milo was down on the floor. He looked like he was dead. I no sooner got in the house than a police car came and the police knocked on the door and asked if everything was alrightbec ause someone was trying to get them. Milo said afterwards that he had been trying to get somebody to come help him ‎(It would be like our 9-1-1 number now.)‎ I took care of him and put him back to bed. He was alright for a while. The doctor hadtake n measide out on the driveway and told me Milo could live for a day, a week, or a month, but I should be prepared. Milo and I talked it over and he told me to go back to college and pick up the year I needed so I could teach school. When hedied, thatis just exactly what I did three days after the funeral. I went half-day for about a year and received my teaching certificate and taught at Koelsch School first grade for twenty-four years. I was in the same room the entire time.
Everything went so smoothly that I knew Heavenly Father was watching over me. That's how I got through it.

Karen: You did a good job raising the children all by yourself. When you were
teaching first grade, there were three first grade teachers. You were friends
then and are still friends now. Is that correct? Irma Smartt, Emily Rogers, and
you? ‎(Mom added Mary Lou Harder.)‎ Tell us about the special student you
had in one of your classes one year.
-- Gloria: About my second year of teaching, the supervisor came to me at the close of the
year and asked if I would take a blind child in school. I told him I had never taught a blind child before and I knew nothing about Braille. She said I could say no if I wanted to, but they would like to try it and would like me to take her. Itol dher I would do that. The lady from the blind school in Gooding ‎(Idaho)‎ came over to my home one day with the little blind girl. She talked awhile and frightened me to death. She wanted to go down the stairs without my help. I finally took onthe task of teaching her. I would go over at 7:00 p.m. and take one of my boys to erase the boards and clean up the children's desks if they needed it. They would clean up the crayon. Kathy was home during this time and enjoyed going over toschool a ndworking and playing around with some of the toys in the room. This little girl now has graduated from the University of Montana and has become a beautiful singer. I feel like I really did accomplish something in my life besides raisemy family. Iknow I did well because I really worked at it.

Karen: What were some of the changes that you saw in those 24 years - with families,
parents volunteering, life changes, etc. There were so many divorces and women went back to work causing things to change quite a bit.
-- Gloria: At first we used to have PTA. I remember belonging to about three PTA's and
going to school all at the same time I know I left my own family alone quite a bit, but they would look after one another. As far as the school families are concerned, the parents would just die to be a room mother. They were very competitivethat way. They would make beautiful things. It seems like I always got the nicest class. I shouldn't say that, but to me they were the nicest children in the school. The parents were fairly well to do and would make beautiful things for Halloweenand V alentine's Day and bring beautiful
refreshments all the time for them. When I retired, I remember the class as a whole gave me a big party and some flowers, and made quite a bit of my retiring. At this time, we had aides to come in and help. I applied for an aide only to domimeogr aphing and that type of thing, but I didn't want them to come in and teach my children. After they graded the papers, you wouldn't know what the children were doing. I wanted to know what they were doing. I would need to re-teach thesubject the n ext day if they all missed something. That would mean it was my fault they didn't learn it. So, I wanted to see what they did myself and didn't want an aide. I took home all the schoolwork and made notes on what the children neededto re-learn.
When I had the blind child, T C. Bird was the superintendent of schools. He would walk into my room any time of the day, so I had to really be on my guard I had to dress and look nicely and see that my room was attractive, etc. The whole schoolbo ard would come in at the same time, all of them, and sit and listen to what went on in my room I do have letters from them thanking me for all the good teaching that was done.

Karen: I had several friends whose children attended your class who brag on you and
said you were the best first-grade teacher there. I know so many who requested
you. I remember the beautiful bulletin boards and all the time you put into
making them -- the American flag, the farm animal bulletin board. You spent
so much time and were so creative. Tell us a little about the changes that
happened while you were teaching, such as the prayer rule, scripture reading,
Pledge Allegiance to the Flag, etc.
-- Gloria: At that time, there was a ruling that we were not to have religious songs, school
prayer, etc, in the morning, Up to that time we had school prayer every morning" We had the Pledge of Allegiance. We were told we couldn't have the school prayer or read from the Bible anymore, so in our workshop our music teacher said wecouldn't do those things any more; but it didn't say anything about singing a prayer song. I had a cute prayer song that didn't relate to any religion, but was just a thank-you song. Every day my children sang that
anyway. I wasn't reprimanded for it until one day a Jewish mother stood outside our doors and listened. She listened to my class and Irma Smartt's class as we both sang the prayer song. She went to the principal and told him we sang religioussong sstill. The principal told us we had probably better discontinue singing. We later had to have our class divided. The principal said he would take the one little Jewish girl to another room as I was overcrowded.
The next day I started in with my prayer song again. About one week in all of my teaching we didn't have the prayer song. I wanted to say something about the class size we had. My first year of teaching, I had 39 first graders. Then I lost oneort wo and had about 37 throughout the whole school year. We used to divide our room up into two reading groups. Finally, we divided it up into three reading groups and gave the children more seatwork. I don't think I ever had less than 25children.
My contract for my fIrst year was $3,600. It increased about $10 - $15 a year, which put me in a higher tax bracket, so it didn't really help that much.

Karen: Did you belong to the teacher's sorority?
-- Gloria: Yes, I belonged to Alpha Delta Kappa ‎(ADK)‎. I was sergeant at arms. It was a
teachers' honorary sorority. A lot of teachers from our building went and we used to have a really good time. The first grade teachers all got together and formed our "Birthday Club" We still have it still 16 years after retirement. We havebecome really good friends.

Karen: You are almost 81 years old. You still have another couple of groups to which
you belong. You go with the people you knew through church when you were raising your family and you have the teacher's group and a family home evening group.
Gloria: Milo and I used to belong to a group when I taught Primary. All the Primary teachers and husbands got together and would always end up at Toni Nelson's place for a party. We would dress up at Halloween, etc. We used to have a good timetha tway. Now I belong to a little study group where we study the Book of Mormon. There are just a few widows from church. We would go out for dinner once in a while. I have kept pretty active all this time.

Karen: What are some of the church callings you had? You mentioned Primary
teacher.
-- Gloria: I was Primary teacher for a long time when I was younger. I was Sunday
School teacher and sang in the choir. I taught Jr. Gleaners in Mutual. I worked eight years in the Boise Temple. I would have to get up really early in the morning when I first started. I would get up at 3:00 a.m. Then my shift changed so Ididn't have to get up until 5:00 a.m. to be there by 6:00 a.m. all dressed and ready to go. This was for two days a week
When my children were growing up, I was co-radio chairman with Milo at Karen's school- South Jr. High. I was a room mother for David's room.
When Milo was alive, he always was Stunt Night Chairman for the entire Boise School District. They put me in as co-stunt night chairman. He did all the work, but I did his telephone calls for him. I was co-stunt night chairman also for JeffersonS chool. I belonged to five different PTA's at one time. We worked a lot in education.

Karen: I remember getting extra points in my speech classes when I needed them to get a letter or something. My teacher gave me a lot of extra points because Dad had given us so much help at school, such as magazines, etc. that helped our class.
-- Gloria: I remember, too, when I was teaching that the supervisor would ask me if I would take my class down to the Lion's Club and demonstrate a reading class to them. She took me several other places. When there was anyone to call on, I wasth eone person who went because I guess I didn't dare say no because I needed my job so badly. I do have some nice letters from all those organizations.

-- Gloria:
I want my children to know how much I love them, for the strength they have given me in times of trial, and we have had such many wonderful times and experiences together. I love them dearly. I want my Heavenly Father to know how much I loveHim. He has guided me throughout my life, especially when raising my children. I know that our Church is true and that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God and was placed here on the earth to restore the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.I kno w that Jesus Christ is the son of God and I am grateful for his atoning sacrifice. I know that we will all be together as a family in eternity, and I am grateful for the love that we have for each other.
Death Her obituary read as follows -
Gloria Newman Petersen died of natural causes and went to meet her Savior on March 11, 2009. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 14, 2009 at Cloverdale Funeral Home with viewing beginning at 1 p.m. Graveside servicewillfollow at Cloverdale Memorial Park. Gloria was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, to David and Jessie Coon Newman. She had one brother and three sisters. She was a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Gloria andhersister Bert h a sang duets on programs all over the Salt Lake area. She participated in the 100th anniversary pageant in the Salt Lake Tabernacle for the LDS Church. Gloria worked for her father in his IGA grocery store while she attendedschool.She attended th e University of Utah for three years prior to marrying Milo James Petersen on June 3, 1936, in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple, and they had five children. The family lived in Salt Lake, Los Angeles, Montana, Bountiful, andBoise.She belonged to fou r PTAs at one time, was on the Boise PTA Council as co-radio chairman with Milo, was co-chairman for stunt night at South Jr. High, and was a member of Alpha Delta Kappa sorority. After Milo's early death in 1955,Gloria raisedher five childr en al one while completing her B.S. degree and was in the first graduating class at Boise State University. She taught first grade at Koelsch Elementary School in Boise for 24 years. She served in various callings inthe LDS Churchand sang in the choir. She served in the Boise LDS Temple for eight years. Gloria enjoyed gardening, sewing, and good music. She played the piano most of her life. Survivors include four of her children, Karen Harris of Boise; M.James Petersenof Boise, and his wife Sandra; Richard Williams Petersen of West Linn, Ore., and his wife Candace; and Kathryn Murray of Blackfoot, and her husband Ronnie K.; and daughter-in-law, Lydia Petersen. She is also survived by 19grandchildren and 38great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, her parents, her son, David Otto Petersen, three sisters, one brother, a son-in-law, a grandson, and a great-granddaughter. The family would like to thank KimAllen and all the staffmembers at Amber Lane Residence in Boise for their tender mercies to our mother. Thanks also to the Accent Hospice staff: Wendy, Becky, and Christine.
Published in the Idaho Statesman on 3/13/2009

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Gloria Newman high school photo 1932Gloria Newman high school photo 1932  ‎(M156)‎
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Gloria Newman college picture 1934Gloria Newman college picture 1934  ‎(M157)‎
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Gloria Newman college picture 1936Gloria Newman college picture 1936  ‎(M158)‎
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Gloria Newman & Milo James Petersen Wedding PhotoGloria Newman & Milo James Petersen Wedding Photo  ‎(M45)‎
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Milo James Petersen

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media/FAMILY DATA FILES/Petersen Side/Petersen/MJ Petersen 1936 wedding.jpgmedia/FAMILY DATA FILES/Petersen Side/Petersen/MJ Petersen 1936 wedding.jpg  ‎(M287)‎
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Milo James Petersen

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Gloria Newman PetersenGloria Newman Petersen  ‎(M22)‎


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Family with Parents
Father
David Newman ‎(I479)‎
Birth 4 April 1880 38 28 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 19 June 1959 ‎(Age 79)‎ Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
3 years
Mother
 
Jessie Coon ‎(I480)‎
Birth 8 August 1883 29 26 Pleasant Green ‎(now Magna)‎, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 30 May 1963 ‎(Age 79)‎ Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Marriage: 7 September 1904 -- Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
11 months
#1
Brother
David Hirst Newman ‎(I59)‎
Birth 26 July 1905 25 21 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 4 April 1993 ‎(Age 87)‎ Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
2 years
#2
Sister
Florence Jessie Newman ‎(I481)‎
Birth 4 August 1907 27 23 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 31 March 1965 ‎(Age 57)‎ Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
6 years
#3
Sister
Bertha Newman ‎(I482)‎
Birth 1 June 1913 33 29 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 2 May 1962 ‎(Age 48)‎ Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
3 years
#4
Gloria Newman ‎(I478)‎
Birth 23 November 1915 35 32 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 11 March 2009 ‎(Age 93)‎ Boise, Ada, Idaho, USA
12 years
#5
Sister
Loraine Newman ‎(I815)‎
Birth 23 November 1927 47 44 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 31 July 1998 ‎(Age 70)‎ Layton, Davis, Utah, USA
Family with Milo James Petersen
Husband
Milo James Petersen ‎(I477)‎
Birth 19 October 1910 24 23 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 25 August 1955 ‎(Age 44)‎ Boise, Ada, Idaho, USA
5 years

 
Gloria Newman ‎(I478)‎
Birth 23 November 1915 35 32 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 11 March 2009 ‎(Age 93)‎ Boise, Ada, Idaho, USA

Marriage: 3 June 1936 -- Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
#1
Daughter
#2
Son
#3
Son
David Otto Petersen ‎(I880)‎
Birth 27 May 1944 33 28 Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 12 April 1996 ‎(Age 51)‎ Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA
#4
Son
#5
Daughter