Elizabeth Jane Bybee  ‎(I214)‎
Surname: Bybee
Given Names: Elizabeth Jane

Gender: FemaleFemale
      

Birth: 23 January 1825 25 22 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death: 13 November 1908 ‎(Age 83)‎ Lewiston, Cache, Utah, USA
Personal Facts and Details
Birth Birth 23 January 1825 25 22 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA

Christening Christening 6 August 1845 ‎(Age 20)‎ Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA

Death Death 13 November 1908 ‎(Age 83)‎ Lewiston, Cache, Utah, USA

Elizabeth Jane Bybee Smith death certificateElizabeth Jane Bybee Smith death certificate


Burial Burial 16 November 1908 ‎(3 days after death)‎ Lewiston, Cache, Utah, USA

Last Change Last Change 11 April 2009 - 09:56:34 - by: mbpetey
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Parents Family  (F17)
Byram Bybee
1799 - 1864
Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Lane
1802 - 1867
Polly Chapman Bybee
1820 - 1902
Rhoda Byram Bybee
1823 - 1908
Elizabeth Jane Bybee
1825 - 1908
Luanna Bird Bybee
1827 - 1884
John McCann Bybee
1829 - 1909
Lucene Bird Bybee
1831 - 1915
David Bowman Bybee
1832 - 1894
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee
1834 - 1834
Jonathan Marion Bybee
1836 - 1836
Robert Lee Bybee
1838 - 1929
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee
1840 - 1840
Byram Levi Bybee
1841 - 1905
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee
1843 - 1846
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee
1845 -


Notes

Note
Incidents in the life of Elizabeth Jane Bybee Smith as given by herself

“I was born he daughter of Byrum Bybee and Betsy Layne Bybee on January 23, 1825, in Barren Country Kentucky. There were twelve children in the family, six boys and six girls, three of whom died while very young. We four oldest girls had to workv ery hard to help support the family. My father was a sickly man therefore could not give his children a good education and as there was no public money, schools were very scarce and the people were unable to educate their children.”

“In those days we had no conveniences, no such things as stoves, washboard, lamps, etc., for lights we used candles made of tallow or a gag absorbed in tallow ‎(called a bitch)‎ and often had to sew or knit by fire light.”

My two oldest sisters were married in 1840 leaving myself and younger sister, the next oldest in the family to help support the family. From the time children were seven and eight years of age they were given different kinds of work to do in the cotton fields and gardens.”

“My mother carded cotton with hand cords while my sister and I used a large spinning wheel to spin the cotton. We had to spin four cuts a day ‎(144 threads in a cut)‎, then we were allowed the rest of the day to ourselves. We were eight and nine ye ars of age when we were taught to spin and toe on small wheels, this we enjoyed very much. Mother always did the weaving while we girls did the housework. All of us had to work; Mother also took the wool from the sheep’s back, washed, corded, and wove it into cloth for clothing, blankets, yarn for stockings, and sweaters, this I also did in later years for my own family. There was always plenty of work for rich as well as poor people.”

“In 1836 when was ten years old father sold his farm and moved from Kentucky into Indiana where he started a new home. Maple Sugar trees grew on the ranch where he settled. We made plenty of sugar and molasses from the sap which came from the tre es. Father was a shoe maker by trade and did very little farming.”

“In the year 1840 a Mormon Elder by the name of Alma Babit came to Indiana preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I thought at the time that his doctrines were very strange. In 1841 two other Mormon Elders came to the state. T hey preached the gospel in this settlement for about three weeks when about fifteen of us were baptized into the church.”

“We moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1842. I went to school that season and in 1843 I went to work on a farm belonging to the Prophet Joseph Smith. I was acquainted with the prophet and his family and always found them to be honest, upright, straigh t forward people and were just what they professed to be. The following winter I stayed at the prophet’s home part of the time. Then went to a friends’ home across the street and took care of a sick lady. The prophet came to came to see her often until her death.”

“His enemies were now after him and he had to flee. He started across the river to Iowa when some of his friends persuaded him to come back calling him a coward, he said, ‘If my life is of no value to my friends, it is of none to myself.’ Heturne d back and said he was going like a lamb to the slaughter.”

“In June 1844, they took the prophet and his brother Hyrum to Carthage jail, where a mob was raised and both of them were killed. After the prophet fell from the jail window to the ground they leaned his body against the well curb. A man steppedu p with a long glittering knife to be-head the prophet. As he raised his arm to commit the awful deed, a flash of lightning came from heaven and paralyzed him and he had to be carried away inert as a corpse and the mob fled from the scene in terro r.”

“The prophet and is brother were taken home and I saw them lying side by side in their coffins. Even then the mob was not satisfied, but kept howling around until the year 1845 when they commenced to drive the people out of Nauvoo and burn theirh ouses, barns, grain, and everything they possessed. Brigham Young sought protection from the government, but with little avail, until they leave the state. They started to leave in 1846.”

“After the Prophet and his brother Hyrum were murdered they tried every way to remove the blood stains from the floor in Carthage jail, but all in vain, it still remains a witness for the entire world to see. Some of them thought at that time ift hey could get a Mormon girl to scrub the floor the stain would come out. They came for me and others but none of us would go.”

“In July 1844, I married Daniel Smith a widower with seven children and left Nauvoo in February 1846 to come West with the Saints. On the 16th day of February we crossed the Mississippi River with ice in flakes as large as a large table floatingo n all sides of the boat.
We went to Sugar Creek and camped about two weeks, waiting for the main body of Saints to get together to come West.”

“Companies were arranged and started for the Rocky Mountains over unraveled roads. Yet everyone seemed to enjoy themselves on the way. In May they stopped and left the people to plant gardens. Later after traveling for several days they made a sm all settlement and called it Garden Grove, and still later another called Mt. Pergah. Some of the saints were left there to prepare themselves and teams for the trip to the Rocky Mountains.”

“We traveled on Westward making roads and bridges until we come to Council Bluffs. Here the government called for 500 men to go to Mexico to fight the Indians. There was hardly enough men to fill the call so young men 18 and 19 years of age went. This was the Mormon Battalion.”

“We traveled on to Mosquito Creek camped there a few days then on to the Missouri River were we prepared for the winter. This place was called Winter Quarters it is now known as Omaha City. In the spring a new company was formed to come west. A l arge body of Saints was left there to build a settlement as we were unable to travel farther we were among those who were left. We stayed here until 1850 then started west. Meanwhile a boy and two girls were added tour family, two of them born on the plains.”

“In traveling up the Platt River we found many Indians and Buffalo by the million. The Indians never troubled us but seemed to think the Mormon people were alright. While crossing the plains our baby girl 17 months old took sick and died. We hadt o bury her on the desolate plain, which was a very sore trial to us.”

“While traveling along the Platt River my husband was appointed hunter of the Company. Thousand of Buffalo roamed all over the plains, they would bellow until they made the whole earth shake. My husband always rode ahead to the Company, so it fel l to my lot to drive the team. While out hunting one morning he killed and brought in a Buffalo calf, and we had to drive several miles ahead of the Company in search of water to dress the meat as we were quite a distance from the river. We drove about 1⁄2 mile from the main course to a pond of water where we dressed the meat. It was very warm, the flies were bad. The horses were turned out to graze and they strayed to the foot hills. Of course my husband had to go after them, leaving me here alone with two little children, not knowing whether or not he would find us alive when he returned on account of wild animals and Indians. Before he got back to the hills a large buffalo bull came down seemingly to get water. He tried every wayto scare him away but could not do so, so he decided to take off his shoes and give the old fellow a race to the wagon as he had nothing with him to defend himself with, but good luck favored him and the buffalo finally turned and went the ot her way. All this time the wolves were howling across the pond about two rods distance.”

“I watched my husband out of sight and by this time the sun was just going down. It was very gloomy and desolate. I saw a man passing down the road, I didn’t know whether it was an Indian or white man, but he went on the other way.”

“By this time my husband had the horses and it was just light enough to see him coming and it was not long before we were on our way back to find the camp. It was so dark we could not follow the tracks. Some of the men were out searching for us.W hen we were about a mile from camp a gun was fired. My husband answered the shot, he had a remarkable rifle and everyone knew the sound of it. The men in camp lost no time in bringing out torches to find us and we were soon rejoicing to be safely back at camp.”

“We traveled on and camped near a spring. We heard a terrible roaring that shook the ground. The men and boys went upon a hill and saw thousands of buffalo. They covered acres of ground and were coming to the spring for water. Most of the peoplew ere terribly frightened, some were crying, some singing, some laughing, some praying and some bringing torches to frighten them away, while others were holding the horses to keep them from stampeding. The buffalo turned and went in another direct ion. This showed plainly to us that the Lord was watching over his people as no harm come to any of us.”

“As we traveled on Westward we found that the Indians were fighting among themselves. Brigham Young thought it best to send out word for the Companies to get together, but the Indians did not bother the saints. This was about three days before we reached Utah. I was never happier in my life then the day we reached Utah.”

“It was a terrible lonesome desolate looking place at this time. The first two or three years it looked like starvation for us and the people had a hard struggle to get along. The Mountaineers offered $1000 for the first ear of corn or bushel ofw heat raised in the Valley. After a few years the people began to prosper. Grains, vegetables, and fruits grew in abundance. They began to build small settlements all through the valley.”

“We then moved to South Weber where we remained until all our children were born except one girl who was born in California. In the year 1863 we moved to California with Ox team. We had several narrow escapes with our lives, with the Indians. Her e they were killing the white people on all sides. We camped on Fish Springs three days waiting for the soldiers to come.”

“One of our oxen strayed away. My oldest son 15 years old was sent to find it. He went about two miles from camp before finding it.”

“Meanwhile the stage picked up a man the Indians had killed. About two or three miles from camp there were 15 or 20 scalps ‎(men, women and children)‎ hanging on the side of a barn.”

“When we camped at Egan Station about two days drive from Fish Springs the men owning the station wanted us to stay that night. We were afraid however and went on and in about three days the Indians killed the men, burned the station and the stag e, this was another narrow escape.”

“Several miles from this place a large rock projected over the road. We were afraid to pass for fear of Indians on the other side. We went through in the night and were not molested by Indians. About 25 men had American horses and as we were trav eling with Ox team we were unable to keep up with them. We were now near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. And after crossing them we had no more trouble with the Indians.”

“We made our home about five years when my husband died, leaving me with six children and only two of them were old enough to earn their living. At that time we were living about a hundred miles from Sacramento on an Island. It was a terrible lon ely place for me. I had a hard time to get along and make a living as we had not lived here long enough to have very much around us, our financial condition was not good and no one old enough to run the farm, but with the help of the Lord I got a long fairly well with such a responsibility on my own shoulders.”

“In high water time we were surrounded by water for several days with no way to get out. We could stand in our door and see waves dashing higher than our house. Many times we looked to be washed away.”

There were lots of wild animals, mountain lions, wolves, wild cats, snakes. It was terrible to send my children to school on account of them. Part of the time they had no shoes to wear and they had to walk three miles through thick timber, six mi les a day for school.”

“One night there was a great commotion among my chickens. I and my youngest son went to see what was wrong. We found it to be a large wild cat. We followed it with a dog and ran from tree to tree for half a mile from the house. We found him perch ed in a large oak tree. I went directly under the tree, my son told me to come back. As I stepped back a little way I could see the cat by the moonlight. My son Micheal ‎(14 years old)‎ killed the cat; we took it into the house and weighted it. It weighted 25 lbs. I could tell a great many thing about the others and snakes, but I have to depend on others to do my writing as I cannot write.”

“We used to cure and smoke our own meat. One day I went to the smoke house to get some salt, when I turned around I saw a large rattler curled up ready to strike. The snakes were very numerous and we had to always be on guard for them.”

“I always had a strong desire to come back to Utah here I could do my duty in the church. I never had any doubt but what the gospel was true and I had great faith in the Lord. I put forth every effort to get back and the way was opened for me.”

“I came back to Utah in 1875. One of my daughters went to Utah on a visit and was married there three years later, in 1880. Had she came back to California to live I might not have come to Utah, but everything worked out in my behalf. So I couldl ive among the saints and I was happy and contented. I lived in Lewiston Utah for ten months. In 1881 I moved to Hooper, Utah where I lived for 9 or 10 years. Here I was President of the Primary Association for 2 or 3 years. Then again I moved bac k to Lewiston, Utah where I remained the rest of my life. I am the grandmother of 57 grand children and great grandmother of twelve great grand children at the age of 83 years.”

She received her endowments in Salt Lake about 1854 or 1855. She arrived in Utah October 1850. She was the mother of eleven children, raised seven of her husbands children, two of the second wife’s children. Her oldest daughter died leaving 4 or5 children whom she raised and later her youngest sons’ wife died leaving two children whom she mothered until nearly grown. Making in all 26 or 27 children she mothered in her life and never complained. She died November 13, 1908. 84 years of age and true to the faith she embraced in Indiana.


Note
The Life Sketch of Elizabeth Jane Bybee Smith
Copied from the book Utah Pioneer Biographies
Volume 26; Utah 31


I was born the twenty-third of January, 1825, in Baron County, Kentucky. My parents were Byrum Bybee, who was born February 25, 1799, in Barren County, Kentucky, and Betsy Lane, who was born January 24, 1801, Washington County, Tennessee. They we renot in the best of circumstances and since their four oldest children were girls, they had to work very hard to help support the family. There were twelve children in the family, six girls and six boys. Three of them died very young.

My father was a sickly man and his circumstances would not permit him to give his children a good education, as there were very few public schools. We had no conveniences, not even stoves, wash boards, or lamps. For lights we used candles made of tallow or a rag soaked in tallow. We often had to sew and knit by fire-light.

When my two older sisters were married in 1840, I was the oldest one left in the family and had to work very hard to help support the rest of the family. I will relate something of how the people had to work them; from the time children were seve nMother carded cotton with hand cards while my sister and I spun it with a large spinning wheel. We had to spin four cuts a day, one hundred forty-four threads in a cut. We also learned to spin flax and had to do the house work while Mother did t heweaving. My mother also took the wool from the sheep's back and washed, carded and wove it into cloth for clothing and blankets and yarn for sweaters, socks, and stockings. Rich, as well as poor, had to make themselves useful in order to live.

In 1836, when I was ten years old, my father sold our home and moved from Kentucky into Indiana where we started a new home. There were many sugar-maple trees on the place, so we had plenty of sugar and molasses.

Alma Rabbit, a Mormon Elder, came into Indiana preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in 1840. I thought his doctrine was very strange. In 1841, two more Mormon Elders came into the state. After preaching in our settlement abo utthree weeks, fifteen of us, including our family, decided to be baptized.

We moved to Nauvoo in 1842, where I attended school one season. I worked on a farm that belonged to the Prophet Joseph Smith for some time, and then went to a friend's house across the street to take care of a sick lady. The Prophet came to see h ervery often until she died. I know the Prophet and his family, and found them to be honest straight-forward people. They were just what they professed to be.

The Prophet's enemies were now after his life. He started across the river to go to Iowa, but some of his friends persuaded him to come back, calling him a coward. He turned and went back, telling his friends that he was going like a lamb to the slaughter. He and his brother Hyrum were taken to Carthage Jail and a mob was raised that killed them both. They leaned the Prophet's body against the well curb and were going to be-head him when a flash of lightening came from Heaven and paraly zed the man that was going to do the deed. Every one fled from Carthage. The two bodies were brought home and I saw them lying side by side in their coffins.

The people of Carthage tried in many ways without success, to get the blood stain from the floor of the Carthage jail. They thought that if a Mormon girl came and scrubbed the floor, the stains would come out. They came for me but neither I, nor any of the other girls would go.

I was married to Daniel Smith, July 4, 1844. He was a widower with seven children, four girls and three boys.

The mob was not yet satisfied. They were howling around until the fall of 1845, when they started driving the people of Nauvoo, burning their houses, barns, grain and everything they owned. Brigham Young sought protection from the government unti lthe people could leave the state.

The people left Nauvoo in 1846. We crossed the Mississippi River on the sixteenth of February. Ice in flakes as large as tables were floating on all sides of the boat. We camped on Sugar Creek for about two weeks waiting for the main body of peop leto get together. The camps were finally organized and started west on untraveled roads. Everyone seemed to enjoy themselves. In May we stopped, planted gardens and bough provisions. Several days travel further on, we planted more gardens at wha t we called Garden Grove. A little farther on, some of the people stopped at Mt. Pisgah to prepare themselves for the journey West. We traveled on westward making roads and bridges until we came to Council Bluffs. There, the Government called fiv e hundred to go to Mexico. There were hardly enough men to fill the call, so young men eighteen and nineteen years old went. We went on to Mosquito Creek, camped there a few days, and went on to the Missouri River, where we prepared to stay for t he winter. It was known as Winter Quarters then, but is now called Omaha City.

A new organization was formed the next spring and the leaders went West to form the settlement. We were unable to leave Winter Quarters until 1850. During this time two girls and one boy were added to our family.

We finally started West again. In traveling up the Platte River, we found many Indians and buffalo by the thousands. The Indians didn't bother us as they thought the Mormon people were alright. The moving buffalo would make the earth shake, and t henoise was deafening. My husband was appointed hunter of the company and always drove ahead of the rest of the wagons. I had to drive the wagon while he was out hunting.

One morning, my husband brought in a large buffalo calf. We drove several miles ahead of the rest of the company in search of water to dress the meat and finally saw a pond of water about a half a mile from the main road. Turning the horses loose we dressed the meat. It was warm weather and the flies were very bad. The horses strayed to the foothills several miles away so that my husband had to go after them, leaving me and two children alone. He didn't know whether we would be dead or a livewhen he returned. Before my husband reached the hills, he met a large buffalo bull coming to water. He had left his rifle in the wagon and had nothing to protect himself with. After trying every way to scare him away my husband decided to tak e offhis shoes and give the old fellow a race to the wagon. As luck would have it, the buffalo suddenly decided to go the other way. During this time, a pack of wolves had smelled the fresh meat and were howling around on the other side of the po nd several rods away. The sun was going down and it was a very gloomy and desolate sight. I saw a man going along the road not knowing whether he was an Indian or a white man. He went on without bothering us. By the time my husband returned with the horses it was so dark that we couldn't follow the road. Some of the men were searching for us, shooting their guns for a signal. We answered the shot and were soon reunited with the camp amid much rejoicing.

A few days later when we were camped near a spring, we heard a terrible billowing and roaring. The very ground that we were standing on shook. The men and boys went to a nearby hill and looking over the plains saw a herd of thousands of buffalo o nthe stampede for water. Most of the people were terribly frightened. Some were laughing, some singing, some crying, others yelling and praying, while the more level headed brought torches to frighten the buffalo and held the horses and oxen to k eep them from stampeding. The leaders of the herd seemed frightened when they saw us and turned off in another direction. I think the Lord was surely with us in protecting his people.

Farther west the Indians were fighting among themselves so Brigham Young thought it best to send word for the company to get together and look out for trouble. The Indians bothered no white people at this time.

I was never happier in my life than the day we arrived in Utah and found peace, although it was a terribly lonesome and desolate looking place. For two or three years it looked like nothing but starvation. The Mountaineers had offered a thousand dollars for the first ear of corn or bushel of wheat that was raised in the valley. The people prospered and the Valley bloomed like a rose. Grain, vegetables and fruit grew in abundance. Settlements were built all around. We moved to South Webe r, Utah where we remained until 1863.

Our next move was to California by ox team. The Indians were very troublesome and we had several narrow escapes. We camped for three days at Fish-Springs waiting for the soldiers to come. The Indians were killing white people on all sides. One da yone of our oxen strayed away and my oldest son, then about fifteen, went after it. He found it about two miles from camp, and got back safely. Meanwhile, the stage picked up a man that had been killed about two or three miles from camp.

When we stopped at Egan Station, about two days drive from Fish Springs, we found fifteen or twenty scalps of men, women and children hanging on the side of the barn. The men at the station wanted us to stay there that night but we were afraid to .Several days later the Indians burned the station, killed the men and took the stage.

Several miles from Egan Station there was large rock that projected over the road. We were afraid of being ambushed by Indians on the other side, but went through safely at night. The soldiers, being mounted on large American horses, were far ahe adof us by this time. We were near the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and had no trouble after crossing them.

We settled on an island about a hundred miles north of Sacramento. It was a terribly lonely place for me, especially after my husband died, leaving me with six children to care and provide for. We had only been there about five years, and our fin ancial affairs were not so good. By the help of the Lord I managed fairly well.

The island was a terrible place for the children. They had to go three miles through heavy timber to school. There were many mountain lions, wolves, wild cats, and other wild animals. Rattlesnakes were very thick and my children were often withou tshoes. During high water time, we were often surrounded by water for days at a time with no way to get out. We stood in the doorway and could see waves higher than the house. A great many times we expected to be washed away.

One time there was a great commotion among the chickens. My oldest son and myself took the gun and the dog and went out to see what was wrong. A large wild cat bounded away into the trees. We followed it from tree to tree until we were about a ha lfa mile from the house. The cat hid in a large oak tree and I went under the tree to try to find it. My son, who was farther back saw the cat and told me to get back so it wouldn’t jump on me. He could see well enough by the moonlight to shoot i t. It weighed twenty-five pounds. I could tell many other experiences with wild animals, but since others have to do my writing for me, I will not.

In 1875, one of my daughters came to Utah to visit. She decided to stay, and was married five years later. I came back to Utah to live in 1880, which I might not have done had my daughter went back to California. I lived ten months in Lewiston, n ine or ten years in Hooper, where I was president of the primary for several years, and then returned to Lewiston, where I have lived since.

I have had eleven children and mothered twenty. Seven were from my husband's first wife and three from his third wife. I am the grandmother of fifty-seven children, and the great grandmother of twelve, at the age of eighty-three. My husband's thi rdwife and one of the children died so I raised the other two.


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Elizabeth Jane Bybee Smith death certificateElizabeth Jane Bybee Smith death certificate  ‎(M267)‎
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Family with Parents
Father
Byram Bybee ‎(I66)‎
Birth 25 February 1799 32 28 , Barren, Kentucky, USA
Death 27 June 1864 ‎(Age 65)‎ Grafton, Washington, Utah, USA
3 years
Mother
 
Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Lane ‎(I184)‎
Birth 24 January 1802 24 26 , Washington, Tennessee, USA
Death 7 May 1867 ‎(Age 65)‎ Smithfield, Cache, Utah, USA

Marriage: 5 January 1820 -- Grafton, Washington, Kentucky, USA
10 months
#1
Sister
Polly Chapman Bybee ‎(I279)‎
Birth 28 October 1820 21 18 Nabob, Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death 5 August 1902 ‎(Age 81)‎ Wilford, Fremont, Idaho, USA
3 years
#2
Sister
Rhoda Byram Bybee ‎(I208)‎
Birth 19 November 1823 24 21 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death 17 December 1908 ‎(Age 85)‎
14 months
#3
Elizabeth Jane Bybee ‎(I214)‎
Birth 23 January 1825 25 22 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death 13 November 1908 ‎(Age 83)‎ Lewiston, Cache, Utah, USA
2 years
#4
Sister
Luanna Bird Bybee ‎(I213)‎
Birth 3 January 1827 27 24 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death 5 November 1884 ‎(Age 57)‎
2 years
#5
Brother
John McCann Bybee ‎(I205)‎
Birth 17 February 1829 29 27 Monroe, Hart, Kentucky, USA
Death 21 February 1909 ‎(Age 80)‎ Uintah, Weber, Utah, USA
2 years
#6
Sister
Lucene Bird Bybee ‎(I77)‎
Birth 7 February 1831 31 29 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death 26 January 1915 ‎(Age 83)‎ Layton, Davis, Utah, USA
19 months
#7
Brother
David Bowman Bybee ‎(I85)‎
Birth 17 September 1832 33 30 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
Death 22 February 1894 ‎(Age 61)‎ Hooper, Weber, Utah, USA
15 months
#8
Brother
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee ‎(I275)‎
Birth 1834 34 31 possibly Bowling Green, Clay, Indiana, USA
Death about 1834
3 years
#9
Brother
Jonathan Marion Bybee ‎(I211)‎
Birth 28 July 1836 37 34 Bowling Green, Clay, Indiana, USA
Death 28 July 1836 Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA
2 years
#10
Brother
Robert Lee Bybee ‎(I209)‎
Birth 4 May 1838 39 36 on Banks of Eel River, Clay, Indiana, USA
Death 4 October 1929 ‎(Age 91)‎ Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA
20 months
#11
Brother
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee ‎(I276)‎
Birth 1840 40 37 on banks of Eel River, Clay, Indiana, USA
Death about 1840 on banks of Eel River, Clay, Indiana, USA
16 months
#12
Brother
Byram Levi Bybee ‎(I278)‎
Birth 4 May 1841 42 39 , Clay, Indiana, USA
Death 7 July 1905 ‎(Age 64)‎ Uintah, Weber, Utah, USA
20 months
#13
Brother
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee ‎(I210)‎
Birth about 1843 43 40 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA
Death about 1846 ‎(Age 3)‎ Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA
2 years
#14
Brother
‎(unknown)‎ Bybee ‎(I277)‎
Birth about 1845 45 42 of, Barren, Kentucky, USA