Alexander Beckstead
Alexander Beckstead
Alexander Beckstead  ‎(I203)‎
Surname: Beckstead
Given Names: Alexander

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 16 March 1802 28 31 , Schoharie, New York, USA
Death: 20 February 1870 ‎(Age 67)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Personal Facts and Details
Birth Birth 16 March 1802 28 31 , Schoharie, New York, USA


Show Details Source: BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Citation Details:  41-44
  Text: Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acr es of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon mission aries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons end uring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigha m Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Intro duction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Al exander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeti ng place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan . The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in n eed. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD
Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acr es of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon mission aries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons end uring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continuedon, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introd uction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where there was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alex ander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as t hey needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in n eed. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.

Marriage Marriage Keziah Albine Petty - 18 November 1854 ‎(Age 52)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Death Death 20 February 1870 ‎(Age 67)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA


Source: BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963

Show Details Source: BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Citation Details:  41-44
  Text: Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acr es of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon mission aries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons end uring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigha m Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Intro duction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Al exander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeti ng place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan . The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in n eed. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New Y ork, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm un til he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in Septemb er 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, theymoved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo , Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies mov ed to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beck stead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they wer e moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothin g but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, a nd some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erecte d the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.

Alexander Beckstead obituaryAlexander Beckstead obituary


Burial Burial 28 February 1870 ‎(8 days after death)‎ West Jordan Cemetery, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA


Source: BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963

Show Details Source: BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Citation Details:  41-44
  Text: Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoha rie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 ac res of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missio naries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons en duringmany personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shouldersof Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Intro duction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Al exander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeti ng place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan . The building was made ofslabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son JohnAlma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in ne ed. He passed away at his homein West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New Yor k, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm unti l he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted t he Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, theymoved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located whereverthey could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.After the death o f Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckst ead boys joined this group, thus reducing thehelp that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were m oving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known asthe River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick a nd shovel, and mostly by hand, built the BecksteadDitch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the riverbottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the fi rst Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to befinished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard tim es when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead ofselling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, are a - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elderin the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.

Alexander Beckstead's graveAlexander Beckstead's grave


Last Change Last Change 18 October 2010 - 15:03:20 - by: mbpetey
View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F50)
Francis Beckstead Sr.
1773 - 1841
Margaret ‎(Margaritta)‎ Barkley or Berkley
1770 - 1811
Helena Beckstead
1797 - 1866
Jacob L. Beckstead
1799 - 1892
Alexander Beckstead
1802 - 1870
Nellie Beckstead
1804 - 1886
Mathew Beckstead
1805 - 1853
Maria Beckstead
1806 -
Moses Beckstead
1807 - 1883
Hannah Beckstead
1808 -
Francis Beckstead Jr.
1810 - 1848
Henry Beckstead
1812 - 1873
Matthew Beckstead
1814 -
Elizabeth "Betsy" Beckstead
1816 - 1852

Immediate Family  (F14)
Keziah Albine Petty
1835 - 1907
Hyrum Beckstead
1855 - 1937
Moses William Beckstead
1857 - 1916
Aaron Beckstead
1858 - 1924
Fannie Keziah Beckstead
1859 - 1936
Robert Beckstead
1861 - 1921
Margarett Albine Beckstead
1862 - 1944
Martha Ann Beckstead
1864 - 1930
Francis Albert Beckstead
1866 - 1952
Ira Beckstead
1867 - 1942
Alexander Beckstead
1870 - 1942


Notes

Note
Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead Sr. and Margaret
Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York on the 16th of March,
1802. He was the sixth of 21 children. His mother died after her 11th child
was born, and his father remarried. There were 10 children from the second
marriage to Catherine Lang.
When Alexander was very young, his family moved to Williamsburg,
Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land under a land grant. It is
assumed therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until
he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince, at which time he farmed for
himself. He and Catherine had 15 children.
During the period of 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the
homes of Alexander, his father, Francis Sr., and others of the family. Most
of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join
the Saints who were then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and
wagons, enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt,
Caldwell County, Missouri the last week in September 1838. ‎(See history of
Francis.)‎ At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs,
and shortly thereafter, our families escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they
spent the winter. The following spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to
the area near Nauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find
suitable places to make a home--some at Lima, some at Carthage, and some
at Warsaw. All of these places are near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander and
Catherine's family consisted of nine children.
When Francis died, Alexander and his brother, Francis Jr., were left to
oversee the care of the families, and later, their journey to the Salt Lake
Valley.
History tells us that the latter part of 1845 and the beginning of 1846,
was a time of preparation of the Saints for the exodus from Nauvoo. Even the
children were involved, parching corn and taking it to the mill to be ground.
Since several Beckstead children were born in the Nauvoo area at this time,
we can assume our people were involved in these preparations.
The exodus from Nauvoo began in February 1846. Some crossed the
Mississippi by watercraft, while others crossed when the river was frozen. We
can only imagine the sadness in their hearts as they left this beautiful city and
their homes.
The exact date our ancestors arrived in the area of Council Bluffs,
Pottawattamie County, Iowa, a distance of about 400 miles from Nauvoo, is
not known. However, the main body of the Saints reached there by the
middle of June 1846. Almost immediately upon their arrival, the United
States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500
volunteers for the Mormon Battalion to fight in the Mexican War. Three of
the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was needed
to look after the families.
Alexander was not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation
for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were
leaving, and had gone only a short distance, Francis Jr. was stricken with
cholera, and died after a few hours of illness. He was buried on the banks of
the Missouri River. This was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the
families. Alexander now had the full responsibility for the movement of the
families to the Salt Lake Valley. He had a large family of young children to
look after, as well as helping his younger brothers and sisters with their
families.
Tragedy and sadness continued with the families as they journeyed
westward. As they neared Wood River, Nebraska, Alexander's sister, Sarah
Louise Beckstead Forbush, was stricken with cholera and died almost
immediately, leaving four little children. The families were determined in their
efforts, however, and finally arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, September 15,
1849. They settled near relatives or close friends in the Cottonwood area, east
of Murray, helping one another provide food for the families.
In the spring of 1850 Alexander moved to the west side of the Jordan
River. He purchased 160 acres of land which extended from where the D&RG
Railroad is now located, southward along the river to Riverton. A number of
the groups located along the river because it was their only source of water.
They were obliged to live in dugouts for a short time, then houses of adobe
until they could haul timber from the mountains to build log houses. They
dug wells for drinking water, and immediately provided a meeting house for
worship, and a school house, very meager but adequate. Later they built the
"Beckstead Ditch" and were able to get water from the river onto their lands.
As they prospered, they built better houses. Sometime before 1853, Alexander
erected the first blacksmith shop in that area.
The following year, Alexander entered into plural marriage. Keziah
Albine Petty, age 19, became his second wife on 18 November 1854. She
became the mother of 10 children, and was 72 when she died. Clarissa Ann
Gilson was 35 when she married Alexander on 3 February 1856. She had
seven children. Clarissa died at age 73. Alexander was thus the father of 32
children, and his large posterity can now be found in many areas of the LDS
church, honoring their great heritage.
During the period 1861 to 1863 Alexander assisted materially in
sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement
West. During the hard times when flour cost $25 a sack, Alexander, instead
of selling his flour, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one
occasion he sent his son John with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people
in the St. George, Utah area--without cost to them.
Alexander was a faithful Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life,
and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan,
25 February 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.

Source: Descendants of John Beckstead by Lee Allen Beckstead -1963

View Notes for ...


Sources
Birth BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Citation Details:  41-44
  Text: Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acr es of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon mission aries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons end uring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigha m Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Intro duction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Al exander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeti ng place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan . The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in n eed. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD
Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acr es of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon mission aries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons end uring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that was so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continuedon, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introd uction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where there was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alex ander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as t hey needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in n eed. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.
Death BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Death BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Citation Details:  41-44
  Text: Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acr es of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon mission aries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons end uring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigha m Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Intro duction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Al exander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeti ng place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan . The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in n eed. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New Y ork, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm un til he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in Septemb er 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, theymoved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo , Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies mov ed to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beck stead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they wer e moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothin g but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, a nd some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erecte d the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.
Burial BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Burial BOOK: Descendants of John Beckstead
Publication: Published by the Beckstead Family Organization in 1963
Citation Details:  41-44
  Text: Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoha rie County, New York, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 ac res of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm until he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missio naries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted the Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons en duringmany personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, M issouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, they moved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located wherever they could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and som e at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children. After the death of Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon th e shouldersof Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckstead boys joined this group, thus reducing the help that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were moving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brothe r of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September 1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Intro duction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known as the River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Al exander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick and shovel, and mostly by hand, built the Beckstead Ditch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the river bottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeti ng place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the first Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan . The building was made ofslabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to be finished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard times when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead of selling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son JohnAlma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, area - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elder in the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in ne ed. He passed away at his homein West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BECKSTEAD Alexander Beckstead, son of Francis Beckstead, Sr., and Maragaret Barkley, was born in Schoharie County, New Yor k, 16 Mar 1802. When he was about five years old his father and family moved to Williamsburg, Canada, where his father secured 200 acres of land, under a Land Grant. It is assumed, therefore, that Alexander worked with his father on the farm unti l he was married in 1823 to Catherine Lince/Lenss, at which time he farmed for himself. During the period 1837-38 three Mormon missionaries visited the homes of Alexander, his father Francis, Sr., and others of the family. Most of them accepted t he Gospel, sold their land, and made preparations to join the Saints then located in Missouri. They traveled by ox-team and wagons enduring many personal hardships, and finally reached DeWitt, Caldwell County, Missouri, the last week in September 1838. At that time the Saints were being persecuted severely by the mobs, and after a short time our familyoes escaped to Far West, Missouri, where they spent the winter. The next spring, 1839, theymoved with the Saints to the area near Vauvoo, Illinois. Our families located whereverthey could find suitable palces to make a home - some were at Lima, some at Carthage, and some at Warsaw, Illinois, all near Nauvoo. By this time Alexander's family consisted of 9 children.After the death o f Francis, Sr., in 1841, the great responsibility of looking after his family, and the others of his father's family, rested upon the shoulders of Alexander. When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846, Alexander and the other familiies moved to the area of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Almost immediately upuon their arrival the United States Government requested President Brigham Young to furnish 500 volunteers for the Mormon Batallion to fight in the War against Mexico. Three of the Beckst ead boys joined this group, thus reducing thehelp that ws so much needed to look after the families. Alexander wsa not discouraged, however, and commenced preparation for movement of the families to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Just as they were m oving, and had gone only a short distance, tragedy struck again; this time in the death of Francis Beckstead, Jr., a younger brother of Alexander, which was a great shock and a tremendous loss to the families. However, Alexander continued on, and most of them reach the Utah Valley in September1849. For more detailed information of the history of our ancestors read the Introduction history section. Alexander Beckstead settled in Weest Jordan, Utah, where theyre was practically nothing but sagebrush. They all located on what was known asthe River bottoms, of the Jordan River, which was their only source of water. Alexander and his family were reported to be the first to get water on the land from the River. They worked with pick a nd shovel, and mostly by hand, built the BecksteadDitch, which permitted them to take the water from the Jordan River for use as they needed it. They had to dig wells for drinking water, and at first most of their homes were adobe huts, and some were merely holes dug into the bank along the riverbottoms. Then as rapidly as possible better homes were built, a Church meeting place was provided, and they had a place for school children, very meager of course. Later Alexander erected the fi rst Blacksmith shop in that area. This shop, built before 1853, was west and south of the Old Rock Meeting house, in West Jordan. The building was made of slabs and rough lumber with a roof of slabs. It did not contain a bench to sit on. The men who came to visit or were waiting for thier work to befinished, just stood around. In 1861 to 1863 Alexander Beckstead assisted materially in sending outfits back to the Missouri River to help the Saints in the movement West. During the hard tim es when flour cost $25.00 a sack, Alexander, instead ofselling his floud, divided it among the poor. It is reported that on one occasion he sent his son John Alma Beckstead with 5000 pounds of flour to the poor people in the St. George, Utah, are a - without cost to them. Alexander was a veteran Elderin the LDS Church during his entire life, and a friend to everyone in need. He passed away at his home in West Jordan, 25 Feb 1870, and was buried in the South Jordan Cemetery.

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Alexander BecksteadAlexander Beckstead  ‎(M121)‎
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Alexander BecksteadAlexander Beckstead  ‎(M120)‎
Type: Photo


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Alexander Beckstead's graveAlexander Beckstead's grave  ‎(M124)‎
Type: Tombstone


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Alexander Beckstead obituaryAlexander Beckstead obituary  ‎(M123)‎
Type: Newspaper


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Keziah A. Petty Beckstead & children abt 1900Keziah A. Petty Beckstead & children abt 1900  ‎(M129)‎
Type: Photo

Keziah Albine Petty
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Family with Parents
Father
Francis Beckstead Sr. ‎(I215)‎
Birth 20 June 1773 35 31 Albany, Albany, New York, USA
Death 1841 ‎(Age 67)‎ Lima, Adams, Illinois, USA
-3 years
Mother
 
Margaret ‎(Margaritta)‎ Barkley or Berkley ‎(I216)‎
Birth 26 October 1770 26 22 of Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
Death 1811 ‎(Age 40)‎

Marriage: 1790 -- Albany, Schoharie, New York, USA
8 years
#1
Sister
Helena Beckstead ‎(I217)‎
Birth 28 December 1797 24 27 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
Death 21 March 1866 ‎(Age 68)‎ Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
17 months
#2
Brother
Jacob L. Beckstead ‎(I218)‎
Birth 8 June 1799 25 28 Albany, Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 1892 ‎(Age 92)‎ , , Canada
3 years
#3
Alexander Beckstead ‎(I203)‎
Birth 16 March 1802 28 31 , Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 20 February 1870 ‎(Age 67)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
2 years
#4
Sister
Nellie Beckstead ‎(I219)‎
Birth 2 July 1804 31 33 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada or, Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 1886 ‎(Age 81)‎
7 months
#5
Brother
Mathew Beckstead ‎(I226)‎
Birth 14 February 1805 31 34 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada or, Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 16 October 1853 ‎(Age 48)‎ Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
11 months
#6
Sister
Maria Beckstead ‎(I220)‎
Birth 1806 32 35 of Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
2 years
#7
Brother
Moses Beckstead ‎(I221)‎
Birth 8 October 1807 34 36 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada or, Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 22 July 1883 ‎(Age 75)‎ Williamsburg, Ontario, Canada
3 months
#8
Sister
Hannah Beckstead ‎(I222)‎
Birth 1808 34 37 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario or, Schoharie, New York, USA
3 years
#9
Brother
Francis Beckstead Jr. ‎(I223)‎
Birth 4 July 1810 37 39 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
Death 1848 ‎(Age 37)‎ Missouri River, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA
18 months
#10
Brother
Henry Beckstead ‎(I224)‎
Birth 1812 38 41 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario or, Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 1873 ‎(Age 61)‎ , , Canada
2 years
#11
Brother
Matthew Beckstead ‎(I227)‎
Birth about 1814 40 43 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario, Canada
2 years
#12
Sister
Elizabeth "Betsy" Beckstead ‎(I225)‎
Birth 1816 42 45 Williamsburg, Dundas, Ontario or, Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 1852 ‎(Age 36)‎
Family with Keziah Albine Petty
Alexander Beckstead ‎(I203)‎
Birth 16 March 1802 28 31 , Schoharie, New York, USA
Death 20 February 1870 ‎(Age 67)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
33 years
Wife
 
Keziah Albine Petty ‎(I204)‎
Birth 8 July 1835 22 29 Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee, USA
Death 23 April 1907 ‎(Age 71)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Marriage: 18 November 1854 -- West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
11 months
#1
Son
Hyrum Beckstead ‎(I68)‎
Birth 27 October 1855 53 20 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 24 April 1937 ‎(Age 81)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
19 months
#2
Son
Moses William Beckstead ‎(I76)‎
Birth 2 June 1857 55 21 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 24 November 1916 ‎(Age 59)‎ Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, USA
11 months
#3
Son
Aaron Beckstead ‎(I69)‎
Birth 12 May 1858 56 22 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 21 January 1924 ‎(Age 65)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
19 months
#4
Daughter
Fannie Keziah Beckstead ‎(I32)‎
Birth 5 December 1859 57 24 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 28 April 1936 ‎(Age 76)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
15 months
#5
Son
Robert Beckstead ‎(I70)‎
Birth 7 March 1861 58 25 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 26 May 1921 ‎(Age 60)‎ South Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
15 months
#6
Daughter
Margarett Albine Beckstead ‎(I71)‎
Birth 26 May 1862 60 26 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 8 September 1944 ‎(Age 82)‎ West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
20 months
#7
Daughter
Martha Ann Beckstead ‎(I72)‎
Birth 16 January 1864 61 28 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 29 June 1930 ‎(Age 66)‎ Grace, Caribou, Idaho, USA
2 years
#8
Son
Francis Albert Beckstead ‎(I73)‎
Birth 15 January 1866 63 30 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 19 September 1952 ‎(Age 86)‎ Midvale, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
2 years
#9
Son
Ira Beckstead ‎(I74)‎
Birth 26 December 1867 65 32 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 17 July 1942 ‎(Age 74)‎ Midvale, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
2 years
#10
Son
Alexander Beckstead ‎(I212)‎
Birth 17 February 1870 67 34 West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death 17 July 1942 ‎(Age 72)‎ Grace, Caribou, Idaho, USA